Posts for January 2020

2020-01-01: 2019 Book Reading in Review

In 2019, I finished and reviewed 40 books, the same as in 2018. Technically, I read two more books than 2018, since I've finished two books (one just before midnight) that I've not yet reviewed, but I'll stick with counting only those books for which I've published a review. I did a little bit better this year in spreading my reading out over the year instead of only reading on vacation. Finding time to write reviews was another matter; apologies for the flood of catch-up reviews in the last week of December.

I met both of my reading goals for last year — maintaining my current reading pace and catching up on award winners and nominees — but only barely in both cases. 2020 will bring schedule and life changes for me, and one of my goals is to carve out more room for daily reading.

I have 10 out of 10 ratings to two books this year, one fiction and one non-fiction. The novel was Arkady Martine's exceptional debut A Memory Called Empire, which is one of the best science fiction novels I've read. It's populated with a fully imagined society, wonderful characters, political maneuvering, and a thoughtful portrayal of the cultural impact of empire and colonialism. I can hardly wait for the sequel.

The non-fiction book was On the Clock by Emily Guendelsberger, a brilliant piece of investigative journalism that looks at the working conditions of the modern American working class through the lens of an Amazon warehouse job, a call center, and a McDonald's. If you want to understand how work and life feels to the people taking the brunt of the day-to-day work in the United States, I cannot recommend it highly enough. These jobs are not what they were ten or twenty years ago, and the differences may not be what you expect.

The novels that received 9 out of 10 ratins from me in 2019 were The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal, and The Shell Seekers by Rosamunde Pilcher. Kowal's novel is the best fictional portrayal of anxiety that I've ever read (with bonus alternate history space programs!) and fully deserves its Hugo, Nebula, and Locus awards. Pilcher's novel is outside of my normal genres, a generational saga with family drama and some romance. It was a very satisfying vacation book, a long, sprawling drama that one can settle into and be assured that the characters will find a way to do the right thing.

On the non-fiction side, I gave a 9 out of 10 rating to Bad Blood, John Carreyou's almost-unbelievable story of the rise and fall of Theranos, the blood testing company that reached a $10 billion valuation without ever having a working product. And, to close out the year, I gave a 9 out of 10 rating to Benjamin Dreyer's Dreyer's English, a collection of advice on the English language from a copy editor. If you love reading books about punctuation trivia or grammatical geeking, seek this one out.

The full analysis includes some additional personal reading statistics, probably only of interest to me.

2020-01-04: podlators 4.14

podlators provides the Pod::Man and Pod::Text conversion modules for Perl. This release is a minor bug-fix release, mostly correcting a test suite problem with old versions of Pod::Simple. The user-visible change is to document that parse_lines and parse_string_document expect raw bytes, not decoded characters.

The other change in this release is internal. I finally finished refactoring the test suite, so now all parts of the test suite use separate snippet files and modern coding style, so it should be more maintainable in the future.

You can get the latest release from CPAN or from the podlators distribution page.

2020-01-05: Term::ANSIColor 5.00

Term::ANSIColor is the core Perl module that provides functions to change text attributes using ECMA-048 escape sequences.

This release adds support for true color (24-bit color), with which I was not previously familiar but which turns out to be widely supported, including by xterm (which calls it direct-color). The new color attributes are in the form rNNNgNNNbNNN and on_rNNNgNNNbNNN and work like the existing color attributes. There is no constant support for somewhat obvious logistical reasons, so they're supported only in the function interface. Thanks to Lars Dɪᴇᴄᴋᴏᴡ 迪拉斯 for the initial patch and drawing true color to my attention.

Color aliases now can expand to more than one attribute. This means that you can do things like:

coloralias('warning', 'black', 'on_bright_red');

and have the expected thing happen. I took advantage of this to clean up the alias handling in general, so you can also now define aliases in terms of other aliases (although the second-level alias doesn't change when the first-level alias changes). The alias fixes are based on work by Yanick Champoux.

Also in this release are a few minor cleanups and documentation improvements.

Finally, this release drops support for Perl 5.6. The minimum supported version is now Perl 5.8. Testing on 5.6 is spotty and Travis-CI doesn't support it, so I don't think I can truly claim it's supported any more.

You can get the latest release from CPAN or from the Term::ANSIColor distribution page.

2020-01-05: rra-c-util 8.1

rra-c-util is my collection of utility code that I use in my various other software packages (mostly, but not only, C).

I now forget what I was reading, but someone on-line made a side reference to formatting code with clang-format, which is how I discovered that it exists. I have become a big fan of automated code reformatting, mostly via very positive experiences with Python's black and Rust's rustfmt. (I also use perltidy for my Perl code, but I'm not as fond of it; it's a little too aggressive and it changes how it formats code from version to version.) They never format things in quite the way that I want, but some amount of inelegant formatting is worth it for not having to think about or manually fix code formatting or argue with someone else about it.

So, this afternoon I spent some time playing with clang-format and got it working well enough. For those who are curious, here's the configuration file that I ended up with:

Language: Cpp
BasedOnStyle: LLVM
AlignConsecutiveMacros: true
AlignEscapedNewlines: Left
AlwaysBreakAfterReturnType: AllDefinitions
BreakBeforeBinaryOperators: NonAssignment
BreakBeforeBraces: WebKit
ColumnLimit: 79
IndentPPDirectives: AfterHash
IndentWidth: 4
IndentWrappedFunctionNames: false
MaxEmptyLinesToKeep: 2
SpaceAfterCStyleCast: true

This fairly closely matches my personal style, and the few differences are minor enough that I'm happy to change. The biggest decision that I'm not fond of is how to format array initializers that are longer than a single line, and clang-format's tendency to move __attribute__ annotations onto the same line as the end of the function arguments in function declarations.

I had some trouble with __attribute__ annotations on function definitions, but then found that moving the annotation to before the function return value made the right thing happen, so I'm now content there.

I did have to add some comments to disable formatting in various places where I lined related code up into columns, but that's normal for code formatting tools and I don't mind the minor overhead.

This release of rra-c-util reformats all of the code with clang-format (version 10 required since one of the options above is only in the latest version). It also includes the changes to my Perl utility code to drop support for Perl 5.6, since I dropped that in my last two hold-out Perl packages, and some other minor fixes.

You can get the latest version from the rra-c-util distribution page.

2020-01-07: C TAP Harness 4.6

C TAP Harness is my test framework for C software packages.

This release is mostly a release for my own convenience to pick up the reformatting of the code using clang-format, as mentioned in my previous release of rra-c-util. There are no other user-visible changes in this release.

I did do one more bit of housekeeping, namely added proper valgrind testing support to the test infrastructure. I now run the test suite under valgrind as part of the release process to look for any memory leaks or other errors in the harness or in the C TAP library.

The test suite for this package is written entirely in shell (with some C helpers), and I'm now regretting that. The original goal was to make this package maximally portable, but I ended up adding Perl tests anyway to test the POD source for the manual pages, and then to test a few other things, and now the test suite effectively depends on Perl and could have from the start. At some point, I'll probably rewrite the test machinery in Perl, which will make it far more maintainable and easier to read.

I think I've now finally learned my lesson for new packages: Trying to do things in shell for portability isn't worth it. As soon as any bit of code becomes non-trivial, and possibly before then, switch to a more maintainable programming language with better primitives and library support.

You can get the latest release from the C TAP Harness distribution page.

2020-01-08: DocKnot 3.02

DocKnot is my set of tools for generating package documentation and releases. The long-term goal is for it to subsume the various tools and ad hoc scripts that I use to manage my free software releases and web site.

This release includes various improvements to docknot dist for generating a new distribution tarball: xz-compressed tarballs are created automatically if necessary, docknot dist now checks that the distribution tarball contains all of the expected files, and it correctly handles cleaning the staging directory when regenerating distribution tarballs. This release also removes make warnings when testing C++ builds since my current Autoconf machinery in rra-c-util doesn't properly exclude options that aren't supported by C++

This release also adds support for the No Maintenance Intended badge for orphaned software in the Markdown README file, and properly skips a test on Windows that requires tar.

With this release, the check-dist script on my scripts page is now obsolete, since its functionality has been incorporated into DocKnot. That script will remain available from my page, but I won't be updating it further.

You can get the latest release from CPAN or the DocKnot distribution page. I've also uploaded Debian packages to my personal repository. (I'm still not ready to upload this to Debian proper since I want to make another major backwards-incompatible change first.)

2020-01-13: New year's haul

Accumulated book purchases for the past couple of months. A rather eclectic mix of stuff.

Becky Albertalli — Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda (young adult)
Ted Chiang — Exhalation (sff collection)
Tressie McMillan Cottom — Thick (nonfiction)
Julie E. Czerneda — This Gulf of Time and Stars (sff)
Katharine Duckett — Miranda in Milan (sff)
Sarah Gailey — Magic for Liars (sff)
Carol Ives Gilman — Halfway Human (sff)
Rachel Hartman — Seraphina (sff)
Isuna Hasekura — Spice and Wolf, Volume 1 (sff)
Elizabeth Lim — Spin the Dawn (sff)
Sam J. Miller — Blackfish City (sff)
Tamsyn Muir — Gideon the Ninth (sff)
Sylvain Neuvel — The Test (sff)
K.J. Parker — Sixteen Ways to Defend a Walled City (sff)
Caroline Criado Perez — Invisible Women (nonfiction)
Delia Sherman — The Porcelain Dove (sff)
Connie Willis — All About Emily (sff)

Several sales on books that I wanted to read for various reasons, several recommendations, one book in an ongoing series, and one earlier book in a series that I want to read.

We'll see if, in 2020, I can come closer to reading all the books that I buy in roughly the same year in which I buy them.

2020-01-17: Term::ANSIColor 5.01

This is the module included in Perl core that provides support for ANSI color escape sequences.

This release adds support for the NO_COLOR environment variable (thanks, Andrea Telatin) and fixes an error in the example of uncolor() in the documentation (thanks, Joe Smith). It also documents that color aliases are expanded during alias definition, so while you can define an alias in terms of another alias, they don't remain linked during future changes.

You can get the latest release from CPAN or from the Term::ANSIColor distribution page.

2020-01-19: DocKnot 3.03

DocKnot is the software that I use to generate package documentation and web pages, and increasingly to generate release tarballs.

The main change in this release is to use IO::Uncompress::Gunzip and IO::Compress::Xz to generate a missing xz tarball when needed, instead of forking external programs (which causes all sorts of portability issues). Thanks to Slaven Rezić for the testing and report.

This release adds two new badges to README.md files: a version badge for CPAN packages pushed to GitHub, and a Debian version badge for packages with a corresponding Debian package.

This release also makes the tarball checking done as part of the release process (to ensure all files are properly included in the release) a bit more flexible by adding a distribution/ignore metadata setting containing a list of regular expressions matching files to ignore for checking purposes.

Finally, this release fixes a bug that leaked $@ modifications to the caller of App::DocKnot::Config.

You can get the latest version from the DocKnot distribution page.

Last spun 2020-06-15 from thread modified 2020-01-20